IVF Treatments Don’t Increase Ovarian Cancer Risks

IVF Treatments Don't Increase Ovarian Cancer Risks

A large study presented at the American Society of Reproductive Medicine yesterday, October 20th, revealed that advanced treatment for infertility including IVF does not appear to increase the risk of ovarian cancer. This was a study done in the UK which followed 255,000 women for up to 20 years evaluating their risk for ovarian cancer. […]

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High Pregnancy Rates with Both Fresh and Frozen Embryos

Fresh Embryo Transfer vs. Frozen

In the last few years our ability to grow embryos for 5 days, at which point they are called blastocysts, has led to extremely high pregnancy rates with both fresh and frozen embryos. Many of the top IVF centers in the country, including ours, have changed to transferring only blastocyst stage embryos (Day 5 embryos). […]

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With Embryo Transfers, is Fresh Best?

Frozen Embryo Transfer

Assisted reproductive technologies (A.R.T.), namely IVF and its science has advanced greatly over the past few years. We can now study the uterine environment as a microcosm and relate the dynamic interactions of the embryo as it begins the implantation process. Emphasis previously was placed on the embryo. Evolving science tells us the endometrium is […]

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BRCA Preimplantation Genetic Screening of Embryos at Increased Risk for Cancer

BRCA1 (BReast CAncer) and BRCA2 are human genes known as tumor suppressors. Harmful mutations of these genes can be linked to an increased risk of breast and ovarian cancer.  In the U.S., between one in 400 – 800 people in the general population carry a BRCA mutation.  Individuals with Ashkenazi Jewish background have an increased […]

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Anti-Mullerian Hormone as a Marker of Ovarian Reserve

Anti-mullerian hormone (AMH), also known as mullerian inhibiting substance, is a regulatory protein found in the ovary.  It is synthesized in the granulosa cells of antral follicles (see drawing below).  AMH is thought to play a role in coordinating follicular development within the ovary; there is a “give and take” between follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) […]

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Surgical Scoring System for Submucosal Fibroids

Fibroids, also known as leiomyoma, are benign smooth muscle tumors within the uterus.  These fibroids can be positioned on the outside of the uterus (subserosal), within the uterine muscle (intramural) or within the endometrial cavity (submucosal).  Previous blogs have discussed the impact of fibroids on reproductive function.  In those patients with submucosal fibroids, how does […]

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Laser Assisted Hatching of Vitrified Embryos

A human egg or oocyte is surrounded by an outer protective shell known as the zona pellucida. As an embryo develops from zygote (day 1) to blastocyst (day 5), the outer zona progressively thins (see photos of day 3 embryo with thicker zona and day 5 blastocyst with thin zona). This ultimately enables the embryo […]

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Growing Sperm from Germ Cells

Scientists at the Institute of Reproductive Medicine in Munster, Germany recently reported on their ability to grow mouse sperm from germ cells.  For men with azoospermia (zero sperm), this technology may, in the future, permit germ cells from a man’s testicle to produce sperm for fertilization.  Currently men with no sperm in either the ejaculate […]

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Spitting: A Bad Habit. The Role of Saliva vs. Serum (Blood) Test for Hormone Evaluation

Patients undergoing infertility treatment are faced with numerous appointments, various testing, “needle-pricks” by phlebotomists, and injections of fertility medications.  Quality centers search for ways to minimize the stress and inconvenience that infertility treatment can impose on patients and search for ways to make treatment more “patient-friendly“ without compromising  pregnancy success rates.  We believe that making infertility […]

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Genetic Disease – Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA)

Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an inherited disease that affects an infant’s muscular activity.  Voluntary muscles are driven by motor neurons.  Children with SMA are missing a gene that is required to produce certain proteins involved in motor neuron development.  Without this protein, the nerves shrink and ultimately atrophy.  Without motor neuron innervation, the muscles […]

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