July 10, 2020

Women Who Conceive Their First Child Through IVF

Women Who Conceive Their First Child Through IVF

When a patient or couple is pursuing fertility treatment, there is always an emphasis on success rates. Success rates for different clinics, success rates for different types of treatment, and success rates for different ages. As a specialty, we have always believed that women who successfully conceive through IVF once will have a favorable prognosis for conceiving future pregnancies via IVF. A recent Australian study published in Human Reproduction now confirms what we have always suspected. Women who conceive their first child through IVF have an excellent chance of conceiving a second child through IVF.

Pregnancy Rates For A Second Successful IVF Are Excellent

In a cohort of over 35,000 women who conceived their first child through IVF, the pregnancy rates for a subsequent successful pregnancy were excellent. Women who required a new fresh IVF cycle for a second child exhibited cumulative live birth rates ranging from 51-70%. Women who used previously frozen embryos had cumulative live birth rates as high as 61-88%. Both fresh and frozen cycles demonstrated outstanding outcomes. Presumably, frozen pregnancy rates were higher than fresh rates because those embryos were generated from younger eggs.

High Success Rates With Women Who Have Previously Had a Live Birth From IVF

These results are very encouraging for women who conceive their first child through IVF. While fertility treatment often feels like a marathon, the majority of patients will ultimately be successful—especially those who have previously had a live birth from IVF. We are very proud of our IVF program at Fertility Centers of New England. Our pregnancy rates remain outstanding, and we offer one of the most cost-competitive programs available.

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Beth Plante, M.D.

Beth Plante, M.D. Board-Certified in Obstetrics and Gynecology, Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility